Comparative research

The societal approach, which has perhaps been most fully explicated in relation to industrial sociology Maurice et al. Key points Comparative research methods have long been used in cross-cultural studies to identify, analyse and explain similarities and differences across societies.

Some large-scale projects are intended to be explanatory from the outset and therefore focus on the degree of variability observed from one national sample to another.

This reluctance may be explained not only by a lack of knowledge or understanding of different cultures and languages but also by insufficient awareness of the research traditions and processes operating in different national contexts.

One should routinely include methodological experiments in cross-national research. And the high esteem for intellectual activity gave rise to a genuine curiosity about other cultures — which has lain thereafter at the heart of comparative inquiry. European programmes often include all EU member states, although the countries concerned may represent very different stages of economic and social development and be influenced by different cultural value systems, assumptions and thought patterns.

Translation

Stringent and well-policed ground rules for comparable survey methods should become much more common in comparative studies than they are now.

In general, however, the only thing that is certain in comparative research issues is the existence of differences to be analysed. The Group has organised four series of seminars in cross-national research methods: Enquiries about the Cross-National Research Group should be addressed to: The term comparative method refers to a specific kind of comparison — the comparison of large macro-social units.

Such projects may draw on several methods: For researchers adopting a normative perspective, comparisons have served as a tool for developing classifications of social phenomena and for establishing whether shared phenomena can be explained by the same causes.

Textbooks on this form of study were beginning to appear by the s, but its rise to extreme popularity began after World War II. Even within a single discipline, differences in the research traditions of participating countries may affect the results of a collaborative project and the quality of any joint publications.

In small-scale bilateral comparisons, this may be feasible, but more often the reality is different, and participation may be determined by factors sometimes political which do not make for easy relationships between team members.

It is largely an empty debate over the definition of the tradition with those questioning whether comparing things counts as comparative research.

Data collection is strongly influenced by national conventions. Globalization has been a major factor, increasing the desire and possibility for educational exchanges and intellectual curiosity about other cultures. Where new studies are being carried out, it should, theoretically, be possible to replicate the research design and use the same concepts and parameters simultaneously in two or more countries on matched groups.

Rules of Comparative Research

Comparative research can take many forms. This study is generally aggregate data analysis.

Like cases are treated alike, and different cases are treated differently; the extent of difference determines how differently cases are to be treated. Quantitative analysis is much more frequently pursued than qualitative, and this is seen by the majority of comparative studies which use quantitative data.

In interpreting the results, wherever possible, findings should be examined in relation to their wider societal context and with regard to the limitations of the original research parameters. At the same time, government departments and research funding bodies have shown a growing interest in international comparisons, particularly in the social policy area, often as a means of evaluating the solutions adopted for dealing with common problems or to assess the transferability of policies between member states.Comparative Research Methods.

Linda Hantrais. Linda Hantrais is Director of the European Research Centre, Loughborough University. She is convenor of the Cross-National Research Group and series editor of Cross-National Research ultimedescente.com main focus of her research is cross-national theory, method and practice, particularly with reference to social policy.

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may not use the same categories.

Comparative research

National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR). Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures.

A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may not use the same categories, or define categories differently.

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. The term comparative method refers to a specific kind of comparison – the comparison of large macro-social units.

The major aim of comparative research is to identify similarities and differences between social entities.

Comparative research seeks to compare and contrast nations, cultures, societies, and institutions.

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Comparative research
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